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 DNS 12 - Ways To Create Stub Zones. Zone Explanation Hard & Easy Ways. Diagram

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Tutorial Overview
Creating (A) records to illustrate different ways to create Stub Zones
Stub zones are a way for different DNS servers from different domains to communicate DNS information to each other. Technically speaking, a stub zone is a copy of a zone that contains only those resource records necessary to identify the authoritative DNS servers for that zone. When someone wants a resource on another DNS namespace, the user first queries his or her specified DNS server. If the DNS server (or any other DNS server on the domain) cannot resolve the query, the server sends its own query to the name servers specified by the stub zone.

Creating Stub Zones in the hard way (Not recommended)
First, while secondary zones contain copies of all the resource records in the corresponding zone on the master name server, stub zones contain only three kinds of resource records: 1-A copy of the SOA record for the zone. 2-Copies of NS records for all name servers authoritative for the zone. 3- Copies of A records for all name servers authoritative for the zone. Stub zones are a new feature of DNS in Windows Servers that can be used to streamline name resolution, especially in a split namespace scenario.

Creating Stub Zones in the easy way (Recommended)
1- A copy of the SOA record for the zone. 2-Copies of NS records for all name servers authoritative for the zone. 3- Copies of A records for all name servers authoritative for the zone. That's it--NO CNAME records, MX records, SRV records, or A records for other hosts in the zone. So while a secondary zone can be quite large for a big company's network, a stub zone is always very small, just a few records. This means replicating zone information from master to stub zone adds almost nil DNS traffic to your network as the records for name servers rarely change unless you decommission an old name server or deploy a new one.

Explanation about how Stub Zones work
You can use stub zones to: 1-Keep delegated zone information current. By updating a stub zone for one of its child zones regularly, the DNS server that hosts both the parent zone and the stub zone will maintain a current list of authoritative DNS servers for the child zone. 2-Improve name resolution. Stub zones enable a DNS server to perform recursion using the stub zone's list of name servers, without having to query the Internet or an internal root server for the DNS namespace. 3-Simplify DNS administration. By using stub zones throughout your DNS infrastructure, you can distribute a list of the authoritative DNS servers for a zone without using secondary zones. However, stub zones do not serve the same purpose as secondary zones, and they are not an alternative for enhancing redundancy and load sharing.